Peer-Reviewed Publications

[Click + to read abstracts and links to download articles]

+ Goldenberg, B. M. (2016). "Youth Historians in Harlem: An After-School Blueprint for History Engagement through the Historical Process. The Social Studies 107 (2), 47-67.

The racial “mismatch” between a non-White student public school population and a primarily White teaching force continues to be underexamined through an appropriate cultural lens. This literature review provides examples of how White teachers must properly recognize non-White students’ actions and rhetoric in classroom settings as valuable cultural capital. By addressing how White teachers must reflect on their own race within the dominant school structure to close the opportunity gap, this literature review presents both a theoretical and a practical “call to action” for how White teachers in urban classrooms must critically rethink non-White students’ cultural capital in the context of teaching and learning. Download article // Access via The Social Studies

+ Goldenberg, B. M. (2015). "Youth Historians in Harlem: Exploring the Possibilities in Collaborative History Research Between Local Youth and Scholars." Education's Histories. [serialized article]

This three part series details my experiences working with high school youth as part of the Youth Historians program. The first two essays are available to read below detailing my collaborative work with youth, breaking down hierarchical barriers in the history discipline through oral histories and other work. The third essay will be released as part of a larger article in 2017. Download article

+ Goldenberg, B.M., Wintner, A., & Berg, C. (2015). "Creating Middle School Harlem Historians: Motivating Urban Students Through Community-Based History." Voices From the Middle 23(1), 73-79.

The Middle School Harlem Historians (MSHH) was six-session after-school program in which middle school students learned to become historical researchers of their community, with the goal of motivating low-performing urban students to write in powerful and inspiring ways. [partial abstract] Listen to NCTE Podcast // Download article

+ Goldenberg, B.M. (2014). "White Teachers in Urban Classrooms: Embracing Non-White Students' Cultural Capital For Better Teaching and Learning." Urban Education 49 (1), 111-114. [Ranked in Top 10% of all academic research tracked by Altmetric]

The racial “mismatch” between a non-White student public school population and a primarily White teaching force continues to be underexamined through an appropriate cultural lens. This literature review provides examples of how White teachers must properly recognize non-White students’ actions and rhetoric in classroom settings as valuable cultural capital. By addressing how White teachers must reflect on their own race within the dominant school structure to close the opportunity gap, this literature review presents both a theoretical and a practical “call to action” for how White teachers in urban classrooms must critically rethink non-White students’ cultural capital in the context of teaching and learning. [full abstract] Download article // Access via Urban Education

General Publications

+ Generations of Giving: The History of the Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation. New York: Teachers College Press, 2017.

Written in partnership with the Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation, located in New York City, this book explores the history of the Dodge family philanthropy from the early 1800s to the present, as well as the history of the Foundation that was established in 1917. This book, published by Teachers College Press, is a limited edition and was presented at the Dodge Foundation Centennial celebration in New York, NY, on September 16, 2017 at the University Club in Manhattan.

Click here to view the dust jacket and more information.

+ The Story of Harlem Prep: Cultivating a Community School in New York City. The Gotham Center for New York City History. Aug. 2, 2016.

This essay describes some my research on Harlem Prep, a community school that existed in Harlem from 1967 to 1974. Specifically, I examine how Harlem Prep was able to create a fascinating, if not uncommon, community between business elites and community activists that cut across racial and ideological lines. More importantly, the school was able to graduate hundreds of students who were former "drop-outs" and other non-traditional students. Read article online

+ Talking Inclusion? Include Our Students. TC Today Magazine 39 (1), 64. Fall/Winter 2014.

This short article discusses, as the guest student writer for Teachers College, Columbia University's official magazine, the importance of including students in education reform decisions. Download article

+ The Unknown Architects of Civil Rights: Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, and Charles Sumner. Los Angeles: Critical Minds Press, 2011. (self-published).

Updated edition in 2017 with new author foreword now available!

BACK COVER: "Winner of the prestigious Carey McWilliams Prize for best Undergraduate Honors History Thesis at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), The Unknown Architects of Civil Rights is a groundbreaking book that re-examines three of the most influential—but largely forgotten—civil rights leaders in American history.

As civil rights history continues to hold a prominent place in American society, it is only through the courageous actions of Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, and Charles Sumner that America’s most prized Civil Rights gains are emblazoned in our Constitution. Without these powerful and then-famous politicians, the 1960's Civil Rights Movement would not have occurred the way it did--or possibly even at all.

During the Reconstruction Era when racism and prejudice was at its height, Stevens, Grant, and Sumner valiantly fought for African American equality only years following the institution of slavery. The Unknown Architects of Civil Rights brings to life the personalities, the struggles, and the legacies of three men who strove towards America’s claim of 'liberty and justice for all' during this unprecedented time in our nation’s history."

Review

“The Unknown Architects of Civil Rights is a model of excellent research, astute analysis, and engaging discourse.... [Goldenberg] succeeds in both differentiating and connecting the efforts of these men to keep America on its uncertain course towards democracy.” --UCLA Department of History

View/purchase at Amazon.com // Find/request at a library

Blog Articles & Essays

Although my opportunity to write freely--free of academic jargon and free of the confines of the Academy--is, unfortunately, too infrequent, I do occasionally have been able to blog about various life topics over a blog that I have kept, dating many years back. While an introduction of my blog can be accessed here, below are a few of my more memorable accounts that I have re-constituted: .

"Love is Real, Real is Love"

August 18, 2016 -- After spending more than a week in Los Angeles visiting with my mom and going through old school work, I was motivated to write a blog about some of thoughts about the role of love in society.

A Theory of Kindness: My Birthday Post

June 9, 2016 -- Inspired by family and friends, a short reflective post about the power and potential of kindness. One of my favorite posts that I often return re-read in moments of reflection.

The Unwritten Words

August 14, 2014 -- A reflection, on the anniversary of my grandfather's passing, about the meaning of the "unwritten words": the words that define us as humans when few are looking and when doing the right thing is often the hardest.

Re-thinking the American Dream for the "Millennial Generation"

March 12, 2013 -- A short call to action to people of the so-called "Millennial Generation" to work together to achieve the type of society we all hope for in an era with seemingly unprecedented challenges.

Cherish the "Little" Moments

September 24, 2012 -- A older, but timeless, reflection on the moments that, at first thought, seem inconsequential but are often the moments with the most life meaning and leave the greatest impact..